Another outing from Bombaugh’s genius. The perils of the English past participle. It speaks for itself.

THE LOVERS. IN DIFFERENT MOODS AND TENSES.

Sally Salter, she was a young teacher who taught,
And her friend, Charley Church, was a preacher, who praught!
Though his enemies called him a screecher, who scraught.

His heart, when he saw her, kept sinking, and sunk;
And his eye, meeting hers, began winking, and wunk;
While she, in her turn, fell to thinking, and thunk.

He hastened to woo her, and sweetly he wooed,
For his love grew until to a mountain it grewed,
And what he was longing to do, then he doed.

In secret he wanted to speak, and he spoke,
To seek with his lips what his heart long had soke;
So he managed to let the truth leak, and it loke.

He asked her to ride to the church, and they rode ,
They so sweetly did glide, that they both thought they glode,
And they came to the place to be tied, and were tode.

Then homeward he said let us drive, and they drove,
And soon as they wished to arrive, they arrove;
For whatever he couldn’t contrive, she controve.

The kiss he was dying to steal, then he stole ;
At the feet where he wanted to kneel, then he knole;
And he said, ” I feel better than ever I fole.”

So they to each other kept clinging, and clung,
While Time his swift circuit was winging, and wung ;
And this was the thing he was bringing and brung :

The man Sally wanted to catch, and had caught —
That she wanted from others to snatch, and had snaught —
Was the one she now liked to scratch, and she scraught.

And Charley’s warm love began freezing and froze,
While he took to teasing, and cruelly toze
The girl he had wished to be squeezing, and squoze.

” Wretch !” he cried, when she threatened to leave him, and left
” How could you deceive, as you have deceft ?”
And she answered, ” I promised to cleave, and I’ve cleft.”

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