Spurgeon’s Sorrows: a book I never realised I was desperate for

If you're from a certain corner of the global harvest field that is the church, then Charles Haddon Spurgeon will be a familiar, if not revered, name. The 'prince of preachers' (as he was known) was perhaps the world's first megapastor - but the wonderful thing about him was that it never went to his head, he wasn't corrupt, he was a character of whom it could certainly be said that 'what you see is what you get.' A far cry, in other words, from the smooth-talking, chiseled and attractive megapastors of today.

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The Paradoxes of Loneliness from Jean Vanier’s Becoming Human

Depression isolates and introverts. It's a brutally vicious circle. And so when one occasionally gets swept up by outbreaks of energy, they are often focused on desperately trying to make connections beyond oneself. It might be music; it might be a conversation with someone who gets it with minimal explanation; it might be words on a page. I love that line from Shadowlands, William Nicholson's TV play (turned into a stage play and then feature film) about C. S. Lewis's grief for his late wife Joy (though bear in mind that the film really misses a lot of the theological nuance of the play, inevitably): 

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