Good Friday and the Crucifixion of Shame

I sometimes wonder whether the pendulum has swung too far. People are too quick to reduce societies to guilt- or shame-cultures, on the convenient premise that both concepts are relative and subjective. Thus we can evolve beyond such antediluvian notions. However, while it's true that in western Protestantism we spend a great deal of time facing up to the realities of guilt (and rightly so, where it is genuine rather than subjective or self-imagined), what of shame? We can't hide behind not being a shame-culture.

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As If These Walls Had Tears: Reflections on Berlin’s Holocaust memorial

Apparently there were only 19 hours of sunshine in Berlin between 1st January and 22nd March - a record low. Such absolute greyness is oppressive. But in recent weeks, there have also been huge snowfalls. The result is an eerily monochrome world. Not ideal for taking sightseers' photographs. But somehow appropriate for a visit to Berlin's Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.

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Resurrection Encounters: now out & published by 10ofThose!

Thanks to the 10ofThose gang, my little collection of Easter narratives is now out and available for purchase. Called (rather originally, don't you think) The Resurrection, accompanied by the all-important, explanatory subtitle First Encounters with the Risen Christ, it's meant to be a bit of a companion to Sach and Jeffery's The Cross. However, it's not quite in the same style as mine is more an expository than systematic journey. My aim was to cover each of the 3 key Easter narratives in turn (from Matthew, Luke and John, in their biblical and length order).

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Rage, Righteousness, the Apostle and the Delphic Oracle

Righteous anger is essential. I'd say there is nothing like enough of it about. But at the same time, I'd say there is far too much anger generally about. There is an important distinction. Trying to establish where it lies is, of course, the trick. You see, far too often, our anger says much more about our own state of mind than any objective problem or reality (whether it be at the macro political level or the micro domestic level). Was reading a children's book about anger the other day. Early on, the writers included a very interesting scenario to provoke some soul-searching.

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10 bringers of deep joy in a crazy and sometimes dark world

I've no evidence to back up this claim, but I strongly suspect that those who have the news on 24/7 will go mad. Simply because 99.9% of news items (which usually consist in the urgent rather than the important) are bad - and when taken in such large doses, they can propel one into the deepest of pits. Or perhaps that's just me. Anyway, we need antidotes, things that bring joy, delight and perhaps even a little dose of optimism. In other words, things to be grateful for. Notice how none of my list involves spending much(if any) money. Which says something in itself, does it not...?

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Bursting the Self-Esteem Bubble once and for all? Glynn Harrison on a Big Ego Trip

It's easy to forget the psychobabble jargon that is now so part of  everyday parlance had its origins in serious academic discourse. It's pretty obvious when you stop to think about it, because all terms, metaphors and concepts must have their origins somewhere. It only takes a few decades or even years before what starts confined to the lecture room ends up on the street (whether the discipline be philosophy, theology, or psychology). What is scary is how many of the psychological assumptions that we take for granted today are built on such flimsy foundations. That is the main thrust of the first half of Glynn Harrison's important new book, The Big Ego Trip.

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Friday Fun 39: Swotting up on the English Reformation (part 3: Elizabeth I)

For the time being, this is our final dip into the murky waters of Sellar & Yeatman's classic 1066 and All That. After all, overindulgence is always wrong. Wouldn't you agree? Having digested the reign of Henry VIII, and then gobbled up his heirs & successors Edward and Mary, we come at last to Gloriana herself, Good Queen Bess, the Virgin Queen, the one who was to be obeyed (on pain of decapitation etc etc). These Tudors weren't exactly a straightforward bunch. No doubt, there were post-natal attachment issues which can explain all the shenanigans.

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If hypocrites aren’t welcome in churches, where else can they (we) go?

Tom Wright wrote a bit of a blinder in the Guardian last week on the media's apparent hypocrisy about hypocrisy - and he made some fair points. It certainly chimed with me at a number of levels, and I could certainly feel a post brewing. Jennie Pollock, however, gave a very thoughtful riposte on her blog, simply pointing out that church and media are not on a level playing field - the Church has an obligation to the Spirit to produce His fruit. She's onto something there; I'm pretty sure she's right to challenge Wright.

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